Where Were These Photos Taken? And some cornbread!:)

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Okay, the main thing I would have zoomed in on is the buggy without any sort of orange safety emblem on the back.  That would mean it was likely a Swartzentruber Amish-owned buggy.  There are large populations in the North Country of New York, but these pictures seem more "Southern" in appearance.  These photos were taken in Ethridge, Tennessee's conservative Amish community.  Now, as a bonus, I'll also post a recipe from that community, a delicious formulation of the southern staple: corn bread. Enjoy! Print Amish Cornbread   Ingredients AMISH CORNBREAD 2 cups cornmeal 2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup sugar 8 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 3 large eggs 2 cups milk ½ cup melted lard or oilAMISH CORNBREAD 2 cups cornmeal 2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup sugar 8 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 3 large eggs 2 cups milk ½ cup melted lard or oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease a 9 by 13-inch baking pan. Sift together the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add the eggs, Read More…

Pennsylvania Dutch Apple Muffin Cake

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We are in apple season so that means lots of delicious goodies that Granny Smiths or honeycrisps can find their way into.  Amish kitchens are full of apple-infused cakes, muffins, jams, salads and ciders this time of year.  Yum!  This recipe comes to me from a Mennonite woman in Pennsylvania. Enjoy! Print Pennsylvania Dutch Apple Muffin Cake   Ingredients 2 c. all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. salt 1¼ tsp. cinnamon ½ tsp. allspice ¼ tsp. ground cloves 1¼ c. sugar ¼ c. butter 1 c. sour cream 2 eggs 1 c. finely diced, peeled apple (I use Granny Smith apples) Butter and fine dry bread crumbs Instructions Heat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a bundt pan or souffle dish and sprinkle with bread crumbs, tapping out excess. Combine dry ingredients and blend well. Melt butter. Off heat, stir in sour cream and beat in eggs. Beat the butter mixture into the dry ingredients and blend until batter is smooth and satiny. Stir in apple. Scrape batter into prepared pan, smoothing batter until it is level. Read More…

Amish Oat Bran Bread With a Tennessee Twist

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Most Amish cooks have a "go to" recipe and this is an easy one that probably has its roots in the "oat bran" craze of the 1980s. Remember back when oat bran was supposed to be the "super food?"  So oat bran was sudden found it everything.  I still love my "Cracklin Oat Bran" cereal on occasion:)    This is a loaf of bread I picked up at an Amish bakery this week.  The recipe comes from an Amish baker in Ohio, but I've also added a Tennessee twist.  Some Amish add a splash of molasses to this bread and gives it a darker and slightly sweeter flavor.  The bread in the photo does not have molasses in it. I sliced some for a BLT sandwich and it's a nice, airy loaf of bread.  Enjoy! Print Amish Oat Bran Bread   Ingredients 2-1/4 to 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour ⅓ cup oat bran 1 package (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast 1-1/4 teaspoons salt 1 cup water 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon cornmeal Variation: 1 /3 cup molasses Instructions In a large bowl, combine 1 cup flour, molasses, oat bran, yeast and salt. In a small saucepan, heat water and honey to 120°-130°. Add Read More…

Just Peachy: EASY Fried Pies

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We can't go more than a few months without talking about "fried pies" on Amish365.com   These snack staples are just too irresistible to leave alone and are super popular in Amish kitchens.  I've seen many different versions.  This was was a fry pie I picked up at Der Dutchman in Plain City, Ohio.  On a fried pie scale of 1 - 10, I'd give it about a 7.  It was good, but definitely not the best I've had.  The best involve a dripping glaze, thick real fruit crimped inside a crispy sleeve of crust.  YUM. This is a picture of my fried pie.  These pies are very popular in Amish kitchens, but they almost seem more popular sold in Amish bakeries than just the average Amish homemaker making them for her kids. I'm not saying they don't, but they definitely seem to be more prevalent in bakeries.  This recipes came to me from a Mennonite woman and it's an easier twist on the sometimes laborious fry pie.  You can use a tube of store-bought biscuits for the "crust" and dried fruit for the filling.  So if you're really busy but still want an Amish-style fried pie, this is the route I'd go! Read More…

Huckleberry Pie, Huckleberry Shakes (and you can use blueberries also)

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Huckleberry season is now in full swing out west and this means the Amish of Montana are enjoying one of the delicious local delicacies.  The wild huckleberries grow high up in the mountains and begin to ripen mid-summer.  Huckleberries also happen to be a favorite food of grizzly bears, so gatherers have to be aware of their surroundings.   Amish cooks in Montana use the huckleberries in pies, milkshakes, shortcakes, and coffeecakes. Look at this delicious huckleberry milkshake I enjoyed while visiting the Rexford, Montana community. This is a huckleberry pie filling recipe.  You then pour this into a pie crust and bake at 425 for about 10 minutes and then reduce down to 350 for another 30 minutes. Yum!  This same recipe can be used interchangeable with blueberries, so there is some versatility here. 5.0 from 1 reviews Print Huckleberry Pie Filling   Ingredients 1 cup sugar 1 cup water ¼ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 1 /2 teaspoons butter ¼ cup clear jel or cornstarch 2 cups huckleberries Instructions Boil together sugar, Read More…

The Amish Cook’s Homemade Bisquick

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Ah, Bisquick, that iconic yellow box which allows you to to make everything from easy dumplings, pancakes, and pie crusts.  I used to buy Bisquick when I was in college so I could make dumplings. I went on a dumpling kick back then after my grandma showed me how easy they were to make.  But what if you don't have a box on hand and a recipe calls for it?  One of Gloria's recipes next week calls for Bisquick and she offers up a "homemade Bisquick" that you can use in place of the store-bought stuff. Print The Amish Cook's Homemade Bisquick   Ingredients 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons sugar 1 /2 teaspoon salt 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon cream of tartar ½ cup butter Instructions Mix until thoroughly combined and use in place of 2 cups of Bisquick. 3.2.2646   Read More…

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