Pennsylvania Dutch Bacon Mashed Potatoes

Bacon definitely seems to occupy a larger spot in Mennonite and broader Pennsylvania Dutch culinary culture than it does in Old Order Amish kitchens.  This recipe comes from a Mennonite woman in central Pennsylvania were old Dutch cooking customs still old sway.  This really seems like a fascinating spin on traditional mashed potatoes, not just with the bacon but with the added crunch of onion and celery.  If anyone gives this a try, let us know how it turns out! Print Pennsylvania Dutch Bacon Mashed Potatoes   Ingredients 4 pounds white potatoes, peeled and quartered ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature 1 small onion, finely chopped 1 stalk celery, finely chopped 6 slices bacon, fried until crisp, drained and diced 1 cup milk Salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Instructions Cook potatoes until tender, drain. Heat 2 tablespoons of the butter skillet. Add onions and celery, cook until soft. Add the rest of the butter to the potatoes and mash until smooth. Stir in onions and celery. Add milk a little at a time until Read More…

Two Sides to Every Story

By Kevin Williams Sam Mullet and his Bergholz clan have been made into monsters in the media over the past few years due to the beard cutting attacks.   Now, hear me out...I don't want anyone thinking I am condoning the attacks. I'm not.  I'm a very forgiving, open-minded person but no matter how you square or spin the story there were people who were attacked, terrified, and suffered bodily harm and you just can't run away from that.  On the other hand, there are almost always two sides to every story.  It's so easy to just gobble up media stories like a kid with Halloween candy.  The purpose of this post is to just remind people of that, to read between the lines, to think critically. I spoke with Sam Mullet's attorney, Ed Bryan, for a long time this afternoon and (yes, he is Sam's attorney, of course he is going to be an advocate for him) but if you listen to him, he paints Sam as a much more sympathetic, theologically grounded man who is a doting grandfather and Dad.  So which is he: a cult-leading monster?  A doting granddad and devoted husband who wanted to start a more Read More…

Huckleberry Pie, Huckleberry Shakes (and you can use blueberries also)

random3

Huckleberry season is now in full swing out west and this means the Amish of Montana are enjoying one of the delicious local delicacies.  The wild huckleberries grow high up in the mountains and begin to ripen mid-summer.  Huckleberries also happen to be a favorite food of grizzly bears, so gatherers have to be aware of their surroundings.   Amish cooks in Montana use the huckleberries in pies, milkshakes, shortcakes, and coffeecakes. Look at this delicious huckleberry milkshake I enjoyed while visiting the Rexford, Montana community. This is a huckleberry pie filling recipe.  You then pour this into a pie crust and bake at 425 for about 10 minutes and then reduce down to 350 for another 30 minutes. Yum!  This same recipe can be used interchangeable with blueberries, so there is some versatility here. 5.0 from 1 reviews Print Huckleberry Pie Filling   Ingredients 1 cup sugar 1 cup water ¼ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 1 /2 teaspoons butter ¼ cup clear jel or cornstarch 2 cups huckleberries Instructions Boil together sugar, Read More…

Random Friday Amish Photo Mash-Up

random1

Sometimes I have photos but they don't really go with a post, but they are still kind of interesting.  So what to do?  I guess I'll just sort of offer them a photo "mash-up" The first image is of a canning closet at an Amish home in St. Ignatius, Montana.  I always enjoy looking in other people's canning cupboards.  This was the home of an elderly couple, so they didn't have a ton of food, but this was plenty to last them the cold winter! And speaking of St. Ignatius, the next photo is of the church meetinghouse and school.  This settlement is New Order Amish.  The church uses horse and buggies, but they are a bit more progressive in some other ways.  Wouldn't you love to attend church with these mountains as a backdrop?! Let's zip back across the country.  This is a funeral near Berne, Indiana, just a mass of buggies out in a field as people head to pay their respects. And zipping back south, this is Beachy Amish Mennonite author, Sherry Gore, standing outside the Amish church in Pinecraft. Heading back north, to the Conewango Valley of New York, "whoopie pies" for 75 Read More…

Coming Soon: Amish365 Plus

pearisburg

CAPTIONS: Scenes from Pearisburg, Virginia, the most remote Amish community I have visited. By Kevin Williams There was someone who left our email list recently with the parting comment "I didn't like that he was making money off the Amish." Okay. This is something I hear from time to time and it always leaves me puzzled.  I'm reading a wonderful book right now by esteemed Amish academic Dr. Don Kraybill about the Amish beard cuttings in Ohio in 2011.    Using that woman's very narrow standard, Dr. Kraybill is "making money off the Amish."   Anyone that writes a book, whether it be about World War II or 9/11 is, in a sense, making money off a tragedy.   My mother-in-law is a nurse at a children's hospital in Cincinnati. So I guess she is making money off sick children?   One of the great things about capitalism is that people can find all kinds of ways to earn income, whether that is opening a lemonade stand on the corner, publishing poetry or being a brain surgeon. Heck, even the Amish make money off of being Amish and there's nothing wrong with that, in my opinion. Read More…

The Amish Cook’s Homemade Bisquick

bisquicki

Ah, Bisquick, that iconic yellow box which allows you to to make everything from easy dumplings, pancakes, and pie crusts.  I used to buy Bisquick when I was in college so I could make dumplings. I went on a dumpling kick back then after my grandma showed me how easy they were to make.  But what if you don't have a box on hand and a recipe calls for it?  One of Gloria's recipes next week calls for Bisquick and she offers up a "homemade Bisquick" that you can use in place of the store-bought stuff. Print The Amish Cook's Homemade Bisquick   Ingredients 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons sugar 1 /2 teaspoon salt 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon cream of tartar ½ cup butter Instructions Mix until thoroughly combined and use in place of 2 cups of Bisquick. 3.2.2646   Read More…

css.php