Tomato Basil Pasta

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Amish gardens this time of year are bursting with ripening tomatoes and fresh herbs.  Meanwhile, homemade noodles are often made in kitchens.  This recipe isn't Amish (It's Rachael Ray's), but my Rachel made it this week and it was delicious so I thought I would share it with you. Print Tomato Basil Pasta   Ingredients ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) (4 turns around the pan) 4 large cloves garlic, finely chopped 3 scallions, sliced very thinly on an angle 6 vine ripe tomatoes, diced Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste 1 pound fresh pasta - your choice, such as penne rigate or fusilli 20 leaves fresh basil, roughly cut or torn Instructions Heat EVOO in a deep skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and gently sautè until garlic speaks by sizzling in oil. Add scallions and saute, 2 or 3 minutes more. Add tomatoes and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer. Bring salted water to a boil and cook fresh pasta until al dente. Drain well. Stir basil into sauce. Bring heat back up to medium. Add pasta to sauce pan Read More…

Plain Kansas: Glass Farmhouses

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PLAIN KANSAS Glass Farmhouses By Rosanna Bauman We have raised Cornish Cross broilers for over 12 years and I can count on one hand the number of times that I thought they were intelligent.  And I wouldn’t even use up all five fingers in the counting! However, I haven’t actually spent that much time observing them as adult birds.  I enjoy watching them as cute baby chicks, but once they lose their yellow fuzz they stop acting cute; so I stop watching them Broilers are laid back and don’t get excited over anything.  They are almost laid back to the point of stupid.  “Hello! When a hawk swoops overhead you are supposed to get scared and run under the shelter, you bird-brain!” Because of the predator problems we experienced last year we moved our broilers a little closer to the house this summer.  In fact, we moved them right up into the side yard. This bit of our property is the third busiest intersection on our farm.  Suddenly, we saw the broilers 20 times a day instead of the two times we’d visit them in the pasture. We would pass the broilers when we went to feed the Read More…

Amish in the News: Mennonite Investors

Ah, money. It really is the root of so many societal issues. But even the most conservative Amish and Mennonites want to see their money grow.  This is an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal today about how a non-Mennonite/Amish financial adviser in Montezuma, Kansas advises his Mennonite clients on money matters.  Click here for an interesting read.   Read More…

Weekly Blogroll: Amish Cinnamon Bread; Running in Amish Country, Casting Call, A Huge Reunion, and an Amish Wedding….

Hello!  Lots of interesting stuff in the blogosphere this past week about Amish culture so let's jump right in. Hope you're hungry! AMISH CINNAMON BREAD:  This really looks like an easy, but delicious recipe.  First, it's not a sourdough bread recipe.  While I love sourdough, dealing with that pesky starter can be a chore.  And this isn't a yeast bread either, so no troublesome waiting for something to rise.  No, this is just an easy "stir n bake" bread that makes something decadently cinnamon-y.  The photos with the recipe are superb.  It makes me want to head into the kitchen now to whip up a loaf, but then I'd have to eat it and I'm trying to lose weight, not gain. Click here for the recipe! MASSIVE REUNION:  I loved this story!  A Mennonite couple who married 100 years ago still have occasional family reunions for the 1200 or so relatives that that couple spawned.  Sheesh, my wife often brings mac n cheese to my family reunion.  How much would she need to make to feed 1200 people?  This reunion is so big it is held in a gymnasium.  For comparison's sake my Mom's family has Read More…

Amish Chicken Brine For Grilling

Barbecuing chicken is a favorite summer pastime among the Amish.  When the summer heat rises the urge increases to get that heat out of the kitchen and move it to the outdoor grill.  Grilling outside is especially appealing in Amish homes because the vast majority don't have air-conditioning so a hot kitchen will simmer up the house in a hurry. This recipe comes to us from Amish cook and farm wife Luella Yoder in Iowa.  We'll hear more from her soon.  Meanwhile, enjoy her recipe for a juicy, juicy grilled barbecued chicken! Print Amish Chicken Brine For Grilling   Ingredients 1 quart water 1 quart vinegar 8 tablespoons salt 4 tablespoons Worchestershire sauce 4 teaspoons black pepper 2 teaspoons garlic salt Instructions Soak chicken in this brine overnight , or a few hours before grilling. We like to put chicken brine on a burner on low before grilling and heat it up a little like ½ hour or so it speeds up the process of grilling. And using chicken with the skin on keeps it more juicy for grilling. 3.2.2646     Read More…

Amish in the News: Amish have less asthma? And Expecting Amish Falls Flat?

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Two Amish in the News articles today, one fun, one medical.   The medical one first. AMISH AND ASTHMA: There are some studies that point to the Amish having lower incidences of asthma.  But does this point to a genetic warding off of asthma or a lifestyle shield of sorts? Or perhaps both?  Click here to read the article. EXPECTING AMISH:   I will confess to not watching this Lifetime movie.  Ever since Aster came into our lives I feel like our TV watching has gone down to virtually nothing.  I may turn on the TV and catch a few innings of the occasional Reds game.  But the time or energy to sit and watch an entire movie?  Nah.  Not going to happen.   So if you are like me this review gives you a pretty good recap (plenty of spoilers and the writer is a bit cheeky, so if that bothers you, don't read it).  After reading the review I'm not sorry I missed the movie, it seems like the premise is pretty unlikely.  Rumspringa is something that the mainstream media obsesses about, but in Amish culture it's not quite the big deal that it is in "media culture."  Click here to read about Read More…

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