The Amish Cook: Quilting, Cleaning and Serving Up Fantastic Fried Rice!

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CAPTION:  Parent-Teacher Association meetings are held in the tiny one-room school next to Gloria's house.  Note the iron bell used to summons students to school and the playground equipment which provides an energy outlet during recess. THE AMISH COOK BY GLORIA YODER Hello to everyone, both near and far. After spending the past 4 weeks with family in Ohio it feels good to be home again. The weather has been perfect since we’re back. Today was a full, yet enjoyable, day. It seems like a lot has happened since we got up this morning. After breakfast and devotions I tackled the apples. I decided to turn most of our apples into applesauce and put the rest away to be eaten fresh or used for making pies or apple crisp. I just relish the aroma of apples being cooked in preparation to be turned into a sauce. With my sister’s help and there are not being too many apples we were able to finish up in time to go to my grandparents where my mother's aunts and some cousins were quilting. I enjoyed the short, half mile walk to their house. Upon arriving I found them sitting around the Read More…

Amish Apple Pudding Cake With Cinnamon Glaze

Apple season is upon us and Amish cooks are spinning these ruby red, golden, and yellow orders into ciders, sauces, and cakes.  We'll be doing a lot of apple recipes over the weeks ahead.  This is an apple cake recipe that comes to me from apple country in Update New York. And, wow, it sounds good! Print Amish Apple Pudding Cake With Cinnamon Glaze   Ingredients 1 cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup butter or margarine, softened 1 egg 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg ¼ teaspoon salt 2 cups chopped peeled or unpeeled cooking apples (2 medium) Sauce ⅓ cup butter or margarine ⅔ cup granulated sugar ⅓ cup half-and-half ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon Instructions Heat oven to 350°F. Grease bottom and sides of 8-inch square pan with shortening. In large bowl, mix brown sugar and softened butter with spoon until light and fluffy. Beat in egg. Stir in flour, baking soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, the nutmeg and salt. Stir in apples. Spread batter in pan. Bake 25 to 35 Read More…

Amish Easy Sweet Cream Baked Chicken

This is a neat recipe sent to me by an Amish woman in Mays Lick, Kentucky.  This is a relatively new Amish settlement outside of Maysville.  Anyway, what sets this chicken recipe apart from so many others is the sweet cream that the chicken bakes in.  It really gives the chicken a flavor that you don't get when it's simply baked.  And most Amish cooks will use their own cream, which infuses it with freshness. So give this a try! 5.0 from 1 reviews Print Amish Sweet Cream Baked Chicken   Ingredients 1 young chicken, cut up ½ cup flour 1½ tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper 3 tablespoons butter 1 1 /2 cups sweet cream Instructions Sprinkle the pieces of chicken with salt and pepper and dredge in flour. Melt butter and fry chicken until a golden brown on all sides. Place the chicken in a casserole, pour the cream over it. Cover and bake in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.) for 2 hours. ' Serve with gravy made from the pan fryings left after frying the chicken. 3.2.2646   Read More…

Amish Butterscotch Cookies

This is an Amish kitchen classic, especially as after-school snack time rolls around! Print Amish Butterscotch Cookies   Ingredients ½ cup shortening 1 cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs ½ cup milk 2½ cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder ¾ teaspoons baking soda (place in the milk) 1 (12 ounce) bag butterscotch chips Instructions Cream shortening and sugar. Add eggs and milk with baking soda. Mix together and add baking powder. Gradually add flour and stir well. Stir in chocolate or butterscotch chips. Place dough by teaspoonsful on a greased cookie sheet. Bake at 400 degrees F until the edge is light brown. 3.2.2646   Read More…

Amish365 Plus Discuss

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Those of you on my email list have already read this basic thread,  but I am posting this more for our Facebook and web audience.  There has been a lot of interest and excitement about Amish365 Plus and I appreciate that!  In the first week we are already halfway to my "bare minimum" subscriber goal and almost 20 percent to my overall subscriber count goal. But I've also had some backlash, which I wanted to address.  The price for Amish365 Plus is .99 cents for the first month and $3.99 a month after (or $10 quarterly).  And that price has had some people in fits.  This is my full-time job and I have to be able feed my family on it, so add-ons like Plus can accomplish that. I'm trying to think of the best possible analogy and this is what I keep coming to: Say you 're accustomed to going to a buffet everyday to eat for free. You can chow down until your heart's content and have for years. No limit: eat, eat, eat on all of the stuff pictured her - for free. But, one day, the chef adds some homemade chocolate cake to the buffet and decides to charge $3.99 for a thick slice. Mind Read More…

Eggs: Refrigerate or Not and Farm Fresh vs. Grocery Store

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In visiting many Amish farms I'll see freshly laid-eggs collecting in the hen house and then just sort of sitting out in the kitchen.  See this sign for fresh eggs for a $1 a dozen.  Wow, sign me up!:)  This sign was at an Amish home outside of Berne, Indiana.  Yet, in the grocery store, refrigeration of eggs is as common as finding Lucky Charms in the cereal aisle. Why is that?  NPR's The Salt answers that question. Meanwhile, this is a photo of two eggs that I cracked open yesterday for my breakfast.  One is a just-laid farm-fresh egg, the other came from my local supermarket.  Interesting the "other" egg was from a package labeled as organic and cage free, so it is supposedly one of the more "upscale eggs."  Can you guess which is which? If you guessed the deep, bright orange egg on the left as being the farm-fresh, just-laid egg, you'd be correct.  So often mass production of food adds color (orange food coloring to our mac and cheese, chemical sprays to apples to make them waxy and red, etc), but with the egg nature does what we Read More…

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